Cover Design Secrets For Indie Authors That Mean More Sales

I read quite a lot of articles every week on ePublishing, but I think this is one of the best articles I’ve read on how to design a book cover that sways readers into buying your books. I found it over on Creativindie.com and it’s written by Derek Murphy. Check out this snippet on crafting clever covers for non-fiction books… the great reset book cover 200x300 8 cover design secrets publishers use to manipulate readers into buying booksMade to Stick Book Cover 251x300 8 cover design secrets publishers use to manipulate readers into buying books

“Here’s a quick rule of thumb: non-fiction appeals to the brain. You want an instantly clever image to catch their men­tal atten­tion.  Non-fiction cov­ers should have a cen­tral “gim­mick” and a solid color back­ground or gra­di­ent (orange and yel­low are very pop­u­lar for busi­ness books. (BTW, notice how wide the spac­ing is between the let­ters on these two cov­ers). You catch the brain’s atten­tion by show­ing a jux­ta­po­si­tion — things that shouldn’t really go together and are unex­pected. Then the sub­ti­tle tells them what the book is about.”

I really liked some of the tips he gave on letter spacing, selecting fonts, color contrast, and adding a blurb on the cover of your book. Read the article in it’s entirety here: http://www.creativindie.com/8-cover-design-secrets-publishers-use-to-manipulate-readers-into-buying-books/ Let me know if you learned anything cool!

Amazon’s Kindle Cover Creator

There may be another indicator that independent writing and publishing is on the rise and profitable. Amazon has a new Kindle Cover Creator tool in Beta testing for those using Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). When I say that adding this feature proves that indie publishing is profitable, it’s because I believe Amazon wouldn’t bother with the cost of creating and adding this feature if they didn’t know that it meant increased sales for them.

While the covers that you can create with this generator are average at best, some of them are still pretty decent looking versus some of the crap that I’ve seen slapped up on Amazon. While a little clunky to use at first, I think that it may be easier to get the hang of after playing around with it several times. Since this tool is in beta and is not available to all KDP users, you still have a shot of creating a cover that your competitors don’t have yet. Of course as the tool catches on, you may want to abandon it after that or perhaps Amazon will be diligent about uploading new templates on a regular basis.

Of course the best thing of all about this new tool is that it’s free! Here are some of the covers that you can currently create using the tool.

kindle cover creator

Source: The Digital Reader

Kindle Cover Creating Resources

Here’s where you can learn more about the new tool: https://kdp.amazon.com/self-publishing/help?topicId=A1DHGMW609HBI8

Here’s another illustration-based cover generator tool I uncovered which is very niche-y but you might like it for a particular book: http://thrilling-tales.webomator.com/derange-o-lab/pulp-o-mizer/pulp-o-mizer.html

You can always search for someone who will create a Kindle cover for you on Fiverr. Of course you need to keep in mind that you have to search through people’s portfolios and understand that you may be getting what you pay for. A simple $5 cover.

Ninja Tip: Remember if you are making your cover image yourself that Amazon as well as the other big e-retailers (Barnes and Noble, Smashwords) recommend that you use a BIG image due to the higher resolution on computers and digital devices. For example, Amazon recommends that ebook cover images are 2,500 pixels tall, with the height 1.6 times greater than the width. So keep that in mind when making your own images.